Friday, February 03, 2006

More on AppleTree charter woes

Mike Rupert of the Examiner has more on the ongoing battle between the AppleTree charter school and residents of the Northeast neighborhood who are trying to block the school's new home. The Northeast Neighbors for Responsible Growth, a group made up of residents surrounding the proposed location of the school on 12th St. NE, have asked a court to issue an injunction against the AppleTree Institute to keep the stop any work on the new facility until DC zoning officials can look at the case.
"The building of a school of this size in a totally residential neighborhood will have a devastating effect on the residential and historical character of the neighborhood," the suit says. "The increased noise, traffic and congestion will have an irreparable harmful effect on the neighborhood and its residents."

Under District zoning laws that were written decades before D.C. charter schools began to proliferate in the mid-1990s, any public school has the right to move into residential areas without a special zoning exemption. Neighbors contend the proposed charter school does not fit the definition of a "public school."
Previous coverage here.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

As someone who lives in the area, I am astonished by the NIMBY mentality of the anti-AppleTree group. Of course, I only rent, and I don't own a car, so it's not my property values being threatened by a bunch of scary preschoolers.

Nathan said...

And if its property values that they're worrying about then they're going about it the exact opposite way. Good schools in neighborhoods increase property values.

Anonymous said...

I’m also astonished at the comments and lived and worked on the Hill for quite sometime and I have seen a change, for the good, but I don’t agree with the anti-school protest actions of the anit-appletree community. I think that these are the new residents of DC that want to make this a bubble community. I have. I believe that the apple tree charter school would be a wonderful asset to the community. As long as I can remember I have always seen schools in neighborhoods, so where do they propose that schools should be built? On highway, downtown? come on people be serious!

Anonymous said...

People get a life, fight about someting serious. It's school, not a jail. These kids won't attack your dogs in Lincoln Park, I promise.

Anonymous said...

Before attacking the anti-AppleTree people get your facts straight! Most of the people opposed have lived in the neighborhood for decades. It is not an anti-school movement - it is a movement to make the school adhere to zoning regulations. Period.

Anonymous said...

The "neighbors" aren't so neighborly. I've seen the way they've behaved at the ANC meetings. I'd like to know what their real motives are? It's more than noise and traffic. Know what I mean?

GOP Hillman said...

Tommy Wells should know that we need a quality preschool option like AppleTree. My friends daughter made it through the lottery to attend AppleTree's preschool in Southwest. They love it.
Wish Capitol Hill had schools like that...

Anonymous said...

I live in the neighborhood (own not rent). While I agree that DC (and particularly capitol hill) can use more good charter schools, I also understand why the neighbors don't necessarily want one on their block. I live very close to another elementary school in that neighborhood and while it's a good school, the principal is great and the elementary kids themselves are adorable... it can be very frustrating at times living so close to the school. It is obviously not any of the above (the school itself or the kids) that is the problem. The problem is with teenagers and adults who party and scream and yell in the playgrounds into the wee hours of the night. The principal is really unhappy about the situation as well because they frequently vandalize school property and spraypaint obcenities on the brick, but there is little anyone can really do about it, because the police don't respond. So if I had to guess about why some of the neighbors are concerned... I'd say that could be a reason